ebuyer daily deals 40% off

Why Convert to LED Lighting?

With a longer lifespan and far lower running costs compared to traditional bulbs, LED lighting is beginning to spread into more homes across Europe, but what do you need to know before you think about converting to LED?led explained header

Over the last two years, the costs of LED lighting has tumbled significantly meaning more households are considering the switch to the eco-friendly lighting option. So what are the advantages and disadvantages of LED, and are they a good choice for your house?

Advantages 

Energy efficient – LEDs are up to 90% more energy efficient than filament or halogen bulbs.

Long-Life – a correctly fitted LED light should last over 50,000 hours, compared to the 5,000 of traditional bulbs.

Durability – LEDs are also somewhat more rugged than traditional lights as they are made of solid material with no filament or tube to break.

Instant turn-on– Unlike eco-lights which have a warming up period, LED lights turn on instantly

Controllable – LEDs can be controlled for brightness and colour as well as directionality. This means there’s no light wasted.

Environmentally friendly – As well as great efficiency LEDs contain no mercury or other hazardous substances.

Disadvantages

Cost Although the price of LED bulbs has fell significantly there is still a higher outright cost price. This should eventually be offset by savings

Over Heating–  Poor quality, or badly fitted LED bulbs are prone to overheating causing the LED to burn out

Directional light– Older LEDs used to emit light like a torch, in straight lines. Although new bulbs have improved the light spread is not quite the same as a standard bulb.

Dimmable compatibility– LED lights are not always compatible with older dimmer units, so a new switch may be needed

 

LED in FOCUSLed lights icons lines

Environment

More Light, Less Heat, Change less often.

Old style bulbs are inefficient as they produce more heat than visible light. By contrast LED bulbs use electricity more efficiently, as they produce less heat and much more visible light. LED bulbs use only 15% of the energy of filament and Halogen bulbs, which results in a significant reduction in energy bills. You’ll also change the bulbs far less often compared to a traditional light.

With LED bulbs becoming even more efficient and prices falling year on year, average payback periods have dropped to below a year, meaning LED bulbs literally pay for themselves in conserved engery. LED is also mercury-free and every reduction in mercury use helps the environment. integral light LED

For more information on energy saving lights check out this great post at shrinkthatfootprint.com

 

Longlife

Hardy, long-lasting and good value 

Know as ‘solid-state’ light sources, LEDs have very long lifespans and are, generally, very robust. While incandescent bulbs may have an expected lifetime (to failure) of 1000 hours, LEDs are often quoted of having a lifetime of up to 100,000 hours – more than 11 years. However, this figure is a little misleading; like all other light sources, the performance of LEDs degrades over time, and this degradation is affected by factors like quality, operating current and temperature. Overall, they will last much longer than incandescent.

At present, there is no standard definition of lifetime for LEDs, although various manufacturers have suggested that lifetime should measured by the time it takes for an LED output to fall under a certain percentage (such as 70% or 50%) of its original value.

 

Save with LED

Cheaper costs Year on Year

A typical 50W GU10 bulb costs around £7.67 per year to run.  An equivalent LED GU10  bulb will only cost 84p a year. (Based of 3 hrs/day and 14p KWh); that’s a saving of £6.83 per bulb. You make similar savings with all types of bulbs including classic globes, candles and mini-globes when compared with filament and Halogen bulbs.

 

Heating

Stay safe

Unfortunately LEDs can’t radiate this heat away in the same way as an incandescent bulb – instead, the heat needs to be drawn away from the LEDs by a heat sink normally located in the bottom of the bulb. The heat sink absorbs the heat produced and then dissipates into the surrounding environment.

 

How do you replace bulbs with LED?

Most LED bulbs have been designed to fit like-for-like into existing sockets, so the process is as easy as….. well, changing a bulb.

To replace bulbs you need to:

Identify the SHAPE and then the BASE (fitting). With spotlights the shape and base are defined together.

bulb-fittings2 ledbulb-shape led

Image: Shrinkthatfooprint

Decide on COOL or WARM WHITE.

With LED bulbs you need to make choice between WARM and COOL white.

WARM white – Yellowish light is what most people are used with traditional lighting. COOL white on the other hand is whiter looking.

There are no rules – You may prefer WARM white for traditional rooms and COOL white for modern rooms and kitchen and bathrooms.

 

Confirm if you need a DIMMABLE OR NON DIMMABLE bulb

A dimmable bulb will work in a dimmable or non-dimmable circuit.   A non-dimmable bulb should only be used in a non-dimmable circuit.

If your existing setup includes a dimmer, you may need to replace the current dimmer with a dimmer designed for LED lighting. This is where you might need to consult an electrician for this bit.

 

VIEW LEDs AT EBUYER

Then there you go, LED away! Alright, to finish off, I’ve gotta throw just one lightbulb joke in:

Q: Why can’t there be an LED beauty pageant?

A: Because the winner would be Miss LED!

 

Ok I’m done….

ebuyer-logo

tech price

29 COMMENTS

  1. No mention at all here of the detrimental health effects for some people of flicker from many LED lights from mains powered drivers.

  2. The flicker is usually from swapping out 12v Halogen downlighters for LED and retaining existing transformer, rather than LED specific driver. I have yet to find a good 50W MR16 replacement. GU10 by TCP (5w = 50W) have been really good, but non dimmable

  3. No mention either of the eye ache some people experience with “cold” white LEDs.
    LEDs improving over time, for example now IKEA to my knowledge only sells warm white LEDs.

  4. Apparently they interfere with digital radio. The answer, don’t listen to the radio at night. 🙂

    Thanks for your input Bryan. Make sure next time you proof read your own text first otherwise it’s just embarrassing.

  5. I bought some LED spotlights, from B&Q, to light my kitchen surface . The light was brilliant: it showed up every scratch in the surface but it was a cold blue light which I found kept me awake in the same way strong coffee does. I returned them to B&Q but kept 2 to use in angle spotlights but I only use them in the morning.

    The sun produces blue light in the morning, yellow in the afternoon and red in the evening and that is what they have on the space station: automatic colour changing BYR LED lights which cost about £300 each.

    While buying some replacement Low energy lights, I considered buying LED light bulbs but they did not state the colour bias so I did not buy any.

  6. Hutch, if the kitchen lights are stopping you from sleeping maybe you should sleep in the bedroom instead!

  7. Some of the mains voltage LED lamps are downright dangerous !! The exposed solder contacts on the printed circuit boards can be at full mains potential !! They have no isolation from the mains….. I have carried out several tests on some of the variations of lamps and can confirm that it is possible to get a significant electric shock from those with unprotected contact areas…… I have reported this problem to Health & Safety.

  8. so an explanation of what LED’s are and their advantages… but doesn’t actually mention what L.E.D. means?

    Impeccable :-/

    FYI: Light Emitting Diode…

  9. To answer your question about colour ratings of LED bulbs, 60000K appears as a pure white light anything below that would be a warmer tone and would be seen as a “yellower” light leaning towards red as this figure gets lower while anything above 60000K would be a cooler tone moving towards blue the higher it goes.
    Hope this helps.

  10. Traditional light fittings usually have a maximum wattage for each light bulb & I always thought this was because the heat that dissipates through the lamp holder restricts the use of higher wattage bulbs. Is this correct & if so, is it possible due to led’s being cooler, to run a higher wattage equivalent led rather than a like for like wattage, to enable a room to be brighter than if you used the equivalent. Example Replace 40watt standard with an led bulb equivalent to a 60watt standard. Clarification of this would be appreciated.

  11. One problem though with switching to LED Lighting that people really dont think of, especially for us living here in Norway, the cold. Yes thats right, the cold is a problem. You see, many of the houses here in Norway (and probably other places in the world) are poorly insulated, which means when you switch from traditional light bulbs into LED Lighting you lose some heating in your house. Because up to 95% of the incandescent bulb’s Electrical Power is turned into heat rather than lighting. As a result your house could be ice cold when it used to be relatively “warm”. Though a simple solution could be getting an electric heater… Concluding, LED is still quite the investment.
    Example: you switch out 20x 50Watts incandescent bulbs to 20x 5Watts LED Lights in your house/apartment, that is a energy reduction of 45Watts per bulb or 900Watts in total. Considering the total 1000Watts the normal bulbs draws from the wall, up to 950Watts of it is heat, that is 950 Watts of heating you have to compensate for somewhere else.
    Just a thought.

  12. Looking to convert from 12v.. 20w, 35w & 50w. What led should I get for each & do I need to get a new transformer for each

  13. To Stephen Murphy.
    Go straight to GU10 lamps. The leads are available separately.

    Also, make sure you choose a decent make as colour can alter awfully batch to batch. Ignore the nonsense 60,000 degree Kelvin talked about earlier. First it’s an extra zero and second it too blue.

    Choose a 5k lamp and that’s much more like proper daylight and brings out the colour of your home.

    David

    PS: Not proof reading a public post is a form of arrogance…

  14. Poor old Danny, you try and produce a nice informative article and the world and its dog jump on you!!!
    I for one would like to thank you for this and the other informative items produced by ebuyer.

    You can always spot the critics – they’re the ones with the sunburnt tongue?

  15. I found the article interesting as I’ve nearly finished converting my entire house to LED lighting. The feedback is good too, and Tartantex’s response on flicker explains why I have this problem in my bathroom.

    And yes, you can up the wattage. My hall light says 60w max but that was never enough for me. So I’ve replaced it with a 12w LED and it’s brighter, whiter and cooler running.

    Lastly Danny, if your plural of dog is the possessive dog’s then ignore the next bit. The plural of LED is LEDs.

  16. What is with the questions about transformers. I have relaced lots of the incandescent bulbs in my house with LED bulbs simply by screwing them into the existing fittings where they work perfectly well.

  17. @ david newt on
    Maybe you should have proof read your own post then.
    “IT too blue”??
    Arrogant prick.

  18. A load of rubbish, light colour doesn’t affect your sleep. Repetition and conditioning is what keeps you in a sleep routine. Anyway, I purchased 8 LED bc candle bulbs for my hall about 2 years ago from pound land and they’re still going. At that price if they fail anytime soon I’ve definitely had my money’s worth. I also had gu10 yellow bulbs in my kitchen for 6 months and decided to change to white light. I still sleep ok. I’ve had no interference through digital radio even when holding the radio next to the bulb. People always look for faults in everything and if they find one, then that applies to every single similar setup, according to them. Just be happy it’s cheaper to run and have whatever colour of bulbs you want in any room you want. I sleep with the lights off so all you who can’t sleep should try the same.

  19. Hi grammardick, you forgot the capital in the word ‘Prick’. Pretentious Twat!

  20. @ twowrongsmakeawrong
    Nice change of name from David Newt on.
    Not important enough of a prick to get a capital.
    Really not bothered about grammar until some “p”rick makes a “h”ypocritical “t”wat out of himself.

  21. The issue of colour is more complicated than where a given LED lamp falls on the Kelvin scale, which is based on the colour reference of the light emitted by a black body heated to the given temperature measured in Kelvin (i.e. 2000k is redder, 8000k is bluer, with most lamps falling somewhere between). There is also the spectral quality of the emitted light.

    An LED lamp that emits light at the same kelvin rating as an incandescent lamp will not have the same spectral curve (which can be displayed as a graph of the frequencies of visible light emitted from a light source). LED lamps, like fluorescents and other non-incandescents tend to achieve their Kelvin rating by a combination of peak emissions at specific frequencies in the electromagnetic spectrum which attempt to fool the human eye into seeing a given colour, whereas if you look at the spectral curve of an incandescent light, it is usually quite smooth, like that of the sun.

    Although this is not something we are usually conscious of, most people recognise that there is something different or “wrong” with the light from non-incandescent light sources. Most of us can train our eyes to identify the differences, but for some people it is a major irritation, while others don’t consciously notice (just like the issue of flickering). However, the psychological effects may be real for all of us in the long-term, whether we are conscious of the problems or not. Ultimately, LED lights have a great future, but they are still at the very early stages of development and until the issues of flicker and colour are addressed, some people will choose to reject them.

  22. The issue of colour is more complicated than where a given LED lamp falls on the Kelvin scale, which is based on the colour reference of the light emitted by a black body heated to the given temperature measured in Kelvin (i.e. 2000k is redder, 8000k is bluer, with most lamps falling somewhere between). There is also the spectral quality of the emitted light.

    An LED lamp that emits light at the same kelvin rating as an incandescent lamp will not have the same spectral curve (which can be displayed as a graph of the frequencies of visible light emitted from a light source). LED lamps, like fluorescents and other non-incandescents tend to achieve their Kelvin rating by a combination of peak emissions at specific frequencies in the electromagnetic spectrum which attempt to fool the human eye into seeing a given colour, whereas if you look at the spectral curve of an incandescent light, it is usually quite smooth, like that of the sun.

    Although this is not something we are usually conscious of, most people recognise that there is something different or “wrong” with the light from non-incandescent light sources. Most of us can train our eyes to identify the differences, but for some people it is a major irritation, while others don’t consciously notice (just like the issue of flickering). However, the psychological effects may be real for all of us in the long-term, whether we are conscious of the problems or not. Ultimately, LED lights have a great future, but they are still at the very early stages of development and until the issues of flicker and colour are addressed, some people will choose to reject them.

  23. Can somebody please advise: I’m replacing my old fluorescent striplighting hidden above the kitchen cabinets. There is no central light fitting, so they are the sole light source (except for some under-cabinet strips).
    I’m concerned that if replacing them with LED strips, the ‘light pool’ would not have enough spread to light the whole room as my present fluorescents do. Also, as my cream cabinets a more traditional than modern style, will I find a soft enough colour in an LED strip?
    Any advice gratefully received.
    Naki

  24. I’m glad that you mention how LEDs have a very long lifespan and are becoming more efficient every year. Since they last a long time, it would probably be a good idea to ensure you know the type of LEDs you want to install so that you can see comfortably while also having the look you want for your home. In order to do this, you’d probably want to figure out what features you want it to have, such as the color or size.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here